Why Do Motorcycle Batteries Die So Fast?

Why Do Motorcycle Batteries Die So Fast?

Riders facing motorcycle battery issues frequently ask experts, why motorcycle batteries die so fast. Here’s the answer to the question. 

Installing heavy electrical devices in your motorbike, malfunctioning stator, not riding the motorbike for months, storing the motorbike for months, not taking care of the motorbike battery, and using the old battery are some reasons why your motorbike battery dies so fast. 

Let’s look at what it means and what you can do about it. 

While writing this post, I leave no stone unturned so you can know everything about your motorbike battery dying so fast. 

Why Do Motorcycle Batteries Die So Fast?

There could be many reasons behind your motorbike batteries dying so fast. Here’re some of the reasons why your motorcycle batteries die so fast. 

Malfunctioned Stator: 

A stator is a device that charges your motorbike battery while riding. Thus it’s one of the reasons why your motorcycle batteries are dying fast. 

With the malfunctioned stator, your motorbike battery either charges too slowly or doesn’t charge. If your motorbike stator isn’t charging your motorbike, the battery will soon go out of charge. 

Installing Unnecessary Electrical Devices: 

Installing too many electrical devices could be why your motorbike batteries are dying too fast. 

Installing unnecessary electrical devices draws too many charges from your motorbike battery. After some time, your motorbike battery can’t withstand longer. 

And soon, it will cause your motorbike battery to die fast.

Storing Motorbike for Years or Old Battey: 

Yes, storing the motorbike for years is also called motorbike battery to die fast. A parasite discharge situation will slowly happen when you store your motorbike for years. 

Storing the motorbike for years or slowly continuing parasite discharge will definitely cause your motorbike battery to die fast. 

And this same goes for using old batteries in your motorbike which no longer respond to charging. 

How to Recharge Dead Motorcycle Battery?

Recharging the dead battery is easy as long as your motorbike battery isn’t sulfated. 

Sulfation is a phenomenon in which your motorbike battery gets deeply discharged. And it causes sulfur from your motorbike battery to accumulate on the lead plate, which finally blocks the flow of electric current. Fortunately enough, you can still save your motorbike battery if the sulfur corrosion isn’t severe. 

If your motorbike battery isn’t severely sulfated, then you need to follow the below steps to reach your motorbike battery. 

Steps to recharge your dead motorbike battery: 

Wear Safety Clothes: 

Wearing safety clothes is the most underrated advice that riders usually follow. 

Recharging the motorbike battery can be a little messy, and that’s why it’s advisable to wear safety clothes only. 

Experts usually recommend wearing full sleeves clothes only because the acid in the motorbike battery could burn your skin. Also, don’t forget to make your room or garage well-ventilated as faulty motorbike batteries may release harmful gases. 

Last but not least, never forget to wear safety glasses and never charge motorbike batteries when it’s hot. 

Remove the Batteries: 

After ensuring you and the people around you are safe, now it’s time for you to remove the battery. 

You probably need a small crescent to remove your dead motorbike battery. Losing the battery connector carefully and carefully removes the small battery caps, so the acid doesn’t spill on you and now, carefully pour all the acid into your motorbike battery. 

Prepare the Salt Solution: 

If your motorbike battery is dead because of sulfation, then you should consider changing the salt solution. 

The best you can use is Epsom, also called magnesium sulfate salt solution, to replace your old motorbike battery acid. 

For making Epsom salt solution, you add 8 ounces of Epsom salt with one-quarter of distilled water. 

Experts recommend heating the distilled water to approx 130F to increase the mixability and remove any harmful minerals. 

Additionally, you should never use tap water when making Epsom salt solution. Tap water contains some minerals, which work the same as sulfate by sticking on the plate and blocking the electric current pathway. 

You can use a plastic funnel to fill each cell of the motorbike battery. And don’t forget to shake the motorbike battery to settle the solution in the battery. 

Connect to the Charger: 

After filling the motorbike battery with the Epsom salt solution now, it’s time to charge the motorbike battery. 

Experts always recommend connecting the motorbike battery with a slow-type charger. Or you can simply use a car charger in the slow-rate charging mode.

Try to understand, motorbike batteries are much smaller than car batteries, and that’s why you must reduce voltage and current rates. Otherwise, your motorbike battery could release harmful chemical gas. 

Connect the positive lead to the positive terminal and the negative lead to the negative terminal and leave the motorbike battery to charge overnight. 

And don’t forget to choose a well-ventilated and cool place to charge your motorbike battery. And ensure there’s no flammable substance around your motorbike battery while charging. 

Also, jumpstart your motorbike battery with the car, as a high voltage electric current can fry your motorbike battery. 

Install Back Your Motorbike Battery: 

After charging the battery overnight, now remove the battery charger once it’s showing complete charging. Also, don’t forget to check the voltage reading through the voltmeter

Connect all wires back carefully and ride some miles to operate your motorbike effectively. 

Can You Charge a Dead Motorcycle Battery through Riding: 

Charging dead motorcycle batteries seems to be rocket science, and that’s why many riders ask whether they can recharge dead batteries or not. 

You can’t recharge your dead motorbike battery only by riding. Your motorbike stator produces less voltage and electric charge, which isn’t enough to charge your motorbike battery. And that’s why experts recommend recharging dead motorbike batteries with the charger only. Also, never use a car’s battery current to recharge your motorbike battery. 

So I think you should spend some bucks on a motorbike charger if you want to revive your dead motorbike battery. 

How Long Would it Take to Charge the Battery By Riding? 

Generally, the motorcycle battery charges best at 13.5-14.5 V, which means you need to ride your motorcycle for at least 3 hours to charge the battery completely. 

As mentioned above, the stator converts mechanical energy to electrical energy. And in this sense, the charging capacity will increase as you increase the motorbike speed. 

You can further decrease the charging time by switching off the additional accessories you installed on your motorbike. Additionally, the smaller the battery size, the faster it would charge. 

Also, read my pervious post where I discussed what is motorcycle battery tender and how it can help you maintaining the good motorbike health, CLICK HERE to read.

Frequently Asked Questions:

How installing unnecessary electrical equipment can makes the battery down?

Installing unnecessary electrical devices draws too many charges from your motorbike battery. After some time, your motorbike battery can’t withstand longer. 

How storing the motorbike for a long time can make the motorbike battery down?

A parasite discharge situation will slowly happen when you store your motorbike for years. 
Storing the motorbike for years or slowly continuing parasite discharge will definitely cause your motorbike battery to die fast. 

Why do experts recommend wearing gloves while charging the motorbike battery?

Experts usually recommend wearing full sleeves clothes only because the acid in the motorbike battery could burn your skin. Also, don’t forget to make your room or garage well-ventilated as faulty motorbike batteries may release harmful gases. 

Can you charge the dead motorbike battery through riding?

You can’t recharge your dead motorbike battery only by riding. Your motorbike stator produces less voltage and electric charge, which isn’t enough to charge your motorbike battery. 

How long would it take to charge the motorbike battery?

The stator converts mechanical energy to electrical energy. And in this sense, the charging capacity will increase as you increase the motorbike speed. 

Final Verdict: 

Why do motorcycle batteries die so fast? Installing heavy electrical devices in your motorbike, malfunctioning stator, not riding the motorbike for months, storing the motorbike for months, not taking care of the motorbike battery, and using the old battery are some reasons why your motorbike battery dies so fast.

I’ve also mentioned some steps you need to take to charge your motorbike batteries. Experts also recommend riding your motorbike for some time after charging the motorbike battery.